Sustainability Statistics

Pioneer Natural Resources Campus

Located in the Hidden Ridge mixed use development, the 35-acre Pioneer Natural Resources campus includes mesquite trees, a small lake and a 10-story office building that will serve as the company’s new headquarters. The topography has a 50 foot elevation change and these steep slopes have been incorporated into the design - the building sits on the ridge at the highest point, offering sweeping views, while the landscape slopes down to the lake. 

The project’s design focused on collaboration, flexibility, high-tech systems and environmental stewardship. OJB’s scope included hardscape and landscape integrated with the existing lake areas, boardwalks and mesquite trees. One important aspect of this project was the client’s desire to keep as much of the current landscape as possible, specifically the trees on site. To do this OJB designed around the existing trees and expanded one of the lakes into a non-forested area with terracing weirs. Various flexible grass spaces, jogging trails, a soccer field, a fitness lawn and a community garden support the client’s emphasis on an active, healthy lifestyle. The project also includes a roof garden connected to the building’s conference rooms  allowing for office workers to enjoy nature or have a team meeting in the fresh air. 

This project has reached LEED Gold and surpassed the original goal for LEED Silver. One of the LEED features that was a major factor in the design of the landscape was the heavy use of native plant species throughout the campus. Additionally, high efficiency irrigation systems help to minimize water consumption. OJB also designed this campus with a limited amount of pavement to reduce the heat of the space. Finally, the lighting used throughout the landscape was designed with efficiency in mind resulting in no light pollution coming from on-campus lighting.

 

Pioneer Natural Resources Campus

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Pioneer Natural Resources Campus

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Pioneer Natural Resources Campus

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Pioneer Natural Resources Campus

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Pioneer Natural Resources Campus

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Pioneer Natural Resources Campus

Pioneer Natural Resources Campus

Located in the Hidden Ridge mixed use development, the 35-acre Pioneer Natural Resources campus includes mesquite trees, a small lake and a 10-story office building that will serve as the company’s new headquarters. The topography has a 50 foot elevation change and these steep slopes have been incorporated into the design - the building sits on the ridge at the highest point, offering sweeping views, while the landscape slopes down to the lake. 

The project’s design focused on collaboration, flexibility, high-tech systems and environmental stewardship. OJB’s scope included hardscape and landscape integrated with the existing lake areas, boardwalks and mesquite trees. One important aspect of this project was the client’s desire to keep as much of the current landscape as possible, specifically the trees on site. To do this OJB designed around the existing trees and expanded one of the lakes into a non-forested area with terracing weirs. Various flexible grass spaces, jogging trails, a soccer field, a fitness lawn and a community garden support the client’s emphasis on an active, healthy lifestyle. The project also includes a roof garden connected to the building’s conference rooms  allowing for office workers to enjoy nature or have a team meeting in the fresh air. 

This project has reached LEED Gold and surpassed the original goal for LEED Silver. One of the LEED features that was a major factor in the design of the landscape was the heavy use of native plant species throughout the campus. Additionally, high efficiency irrigation systems help to minimize water consumption. OJB also designed this campus with a limited amount of pavement to reduce the heat of the space. Finally, the lighting used throughout the landscape was designed with efficiency in mind resulting in no light pollution coming from on-campus lighting.