The Brochstein Pavilion at Rice University

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The Brochstein Pavilion at Rice University

Play VideoPlay Video Sustainability StatisticsSustainability Statistics Close DetailsMore Details

The Brochstein Pavilion at Rice University

Play VideoPlay Video Sustainability StatisticsSustainability Statistics Close DetailsMore Details

The Brochstein Pavilion at Rice University

Play VideoPlay Video Sustainability StatisticsSustainability Statistics Close DetailsMore Details

The Brochstein Pavilion at Rice University

Play VideoPlay Video Sustainability StatisticsSustainability Statistics Close DetailsMore Details

The Brochstein Pavilion at Rice University

Play VideoPlay Video Sustainability StatisticsSustainability Statistics Close DetailsMore Details

The Brochstein Pavilion at Rice University

Play VideoPlay Video Sustainability StatisticsSustainability Statistics Close DetailsMore Details

The Brochstein Pavilion at Rice University

Play VideoPlay Video Sustainability StatisticsSustainability Statistics Close DetailsMore Details

The Brochstein Pavilion at Rice University

Sustainability Statistics

Land

  • The historic context of the site was considered, as the project is positioned in the middle of a prestigious uniformed campus. The landscape helps unite the architecture.
  • Healthy soils were conserved on-site.

Planting

  • Appropriate vegetation was conserved.
  • Annual planting was avoided.
  • 91 trees were saved on-site.
  • 69 trees were planted.

Water

  • Trees have the potential for intercepting 80,000 gallons of water which are equivalent to the water usage for 80 American residents for one day.*
  • The trees on this site can intercept 56 inches of rain in a year. This exceeds the site's average annual rainfall of 49.6 inches of rainfall.
  • 56% of surfaces are permeable.

Carbon, Energy + Air

  • The project reduces light pollution with full cutoff fixtures in support of the dark skies initiative.
  • A fountain is introduced to reduce the temperature in an outdoor study space.
  • The trees sequester 19,200 pounds of carbon annually, which offset 2.3 cars per year.**
  • Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke is minimized with prohibited smoking on-site.

Waste

  • Reusable vegetation, rocks, and soil are diverted from disposal.

Social

  • The project provides optimum site accessibility, safety, and wayfinding.
  • The Brochstein Pavillion is an amenity for research, meetings, and gathering for the entire community.
  • Outdoor fitness, academic classes, and educational tours take place on the landscape surrounding the pavilion.

* The tree average for water interception is 400 gallons. (treebenefits.com) American’s use an average of 100 gallons of water per day (EPA’s water trivia facts) 

**120 pounds of CO2 per tree annually (This number is based on an average from the National Tree Benefits Calculator) One car produces an average of 8,320 pounds of CO2 per year. (The Code of Federal Regulations - 40 CFR 600.113)

The Brochstein Pavilion at Rice University

A key element of the “Vision for the Second Century” strategic plan, the Brochstein Pavilion has transformed 15,000 SF of unstructured, underutilized quadrangle into the center of student activity on Rice University’s campus. Originally on the main axis of Cram Goodhue and Ferguson’s 1910 Beaux-Arts campus plan, this quadrangle was cut off by the addition of the Fondren Library in the 1940s. When the university challenged the design team to create an iconic campus landmark here, Thomas Phifer and Partners and the Office of James Burnett proposed a 6,000 SF pavilion and a series of flexible garden rooms that reinvigorated this space and reconnected it with the greater campus.

Meticulously detailed and unpretentious, the transparency of the 6,000-SF glass, steel, and aluminum pavilion offers a sublime contrast to the surrounding architecture. The 10,000 SF concrete plaza surrounding the pavilion is sandblasted and scored in a simple geometric pattern that references the structural grid of the building.

New concrete walks and a row of specimen live oaks reinforce the existing spatial framework of the quadrangle to the west. To the east, a grid of specimen elms rises from a plane of decomposed granite and provides an organizational framework for two garden rooms that humanize the scale of the library. Long black concrete fountains occupy the center of each space, filling the garden with sound and reflected light. Movable furniture and subtle site lighting allow impromptu gatherings of visitors to enjoy the oasis created by the dense shade and running water.

Location: Houston, TX

Team: Thomas Phifer & Partners, Fisher Marantz Stone, Walter P. Moore, Ulrich Engineers, Altieri Sebor Wieber, Haynes Whaley Associates

Awards: ASLA National Honor Award, Design; ASLA Texas Chapter Merit Award; AIA National Honor Award; AS&U Architectural Citation