Toyota North American Headquarters

Sustainability StatisticsSustainability Statistics Close DetailsMore Details

Toyota North American Headquarters

Sustainability StatisticsSustainability Statistics Close DetailsMore Details

Toyota North American Headquarters

Sustainability StatisticsSustainability Statistics Close DetailsMore Details

Toyota North American Headquarters

Sustainability StatisticsSustainability Statistics Close DetailsMore Details

Toyota North American Headquarters

Sustainability StatisticsSustainability Statistics Close DetailsMore Details

Toyota North American Headquarters

Sustainability StatisticsSustainability Statistics Close DetailsMore Details

Toyota North American Headquarters

Sustainability StatisticsSustainability Statistics Close DetailsMore Details

Toyota North American Headquarters

Sustainability Statistics

Site

  • The campus is 2 million square feet, 100 acres and located in Plano, Texas. 
  • Toyota moved from Torrance, California to Plano, Texas, with a goal of aligning sales and manufacturing workers into one single operating culture. 

Planting

  • 100 trees were protected on site. 
  • 1,515 trees were planted, including Chinese Pistache, Honey Mesquite, Burr Oak, Red Oak, Chinkapin Pak, Southern Live Oak, Cedar Elms.  
  • Native shrubs, grasses and perennials were planted on site.
  • The project fosters habitat creation.
  • The perimeter of the site is planted with prairie seed mixes.
  • Plants are allowed to go to seed/flower life.
  • The project avoids annual planting.
  • Low water usage planting were used on site.
  • Geotextiles and certain plants were used to stabilize soils on slopes.

Water

  • Stormwater is reused for landscape irrigation, collecting in a cisterns what can hold 400,000 gallons of harvested rain water. This systems stores enough water for 3 months of irrigation needs. 
  • The site design mitigates runoff. There were two tributaries on site and a wetland that was approximately 350 sqft with a rough grade difference of approximately 20 ft. The tributary on the north east side of the site was preserved and enhanced and a new 4,000 sqft bioswale is designed to retain water and offer natural infiltration.
  • Green roofs are installed to reduce the heat island effect, absorb storm water and provide enjoyment to the users. Permeable pavers are placed in the parking lot to allow water to recharge aquifer.
  • Trees have the potential for intercepting 800,000 gallons of water which is the equivalent to the water usage for 8,000 American residents for one day. *

Carbon, Energy + Air

  • Energy is harvested from the sun with 20,000 solar panels providing 8.79 megawatts system.
  • The project uses planting to minimize building energy use by planting around and in-between buildings, which reduces the amount of heat on a hot Plano day.
  • The project uses regional materials.
  • The project reduces light pollution with lights that avoid BUG (backlight, up light and glare).
  • The site design maintains 74% for landscape amenities and 26% for the building footprint.
  • The trees sequester 192,000 pounds of carbon annually, which offsets 23 cars per year ** 
  • Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke was minimized 

Economics

  • The project provides benefits beyond its own footprint. It brought 4,000 team members to Plano and hired more than 1,000 new team members from local talent. This job creation creates a catalyst of development for the city such as need for more housing, restaurants, gyms and shops.
  • The project’s construction created a collective five million hours of work. 

Social

  • The project provides benefits beyond its own footprint. It brought 4,000 team members to Plano and hired more than 1,000 new team members from local talent. This job creation creates a catalyst of development for the city such as need for more housing, restaurants, gyms and shops.
  • The project’s construction created a collective five million hours of work. 

* The tree average for water interception is 500 gallons. American’s use an average of 100 gallons of water per day (EPA’s water trivia facts)

** 120 pounds of CO2 per tree annually (This number is based on an average from the National Tree Benefits Calculator) One car produces an average of 8,320 pounds of CO2 per year. Each vehicle drives an average of 11,318 miles per year. (The Code of Federal Regulations - 40 CFR 600.113)

Toyota North American Headquarters

The design for the Toyota North American Headquarters in Plano, TX was inspired by the vision of bringing employees together onto one 100-acre campus, helping reinforce the company ethos of “One Toyota” as well as creating spaces to inspire and collaborate. Toyota’s core values encouraged the campus’ design, while the gestural nature of many automobile design drawings drove the layout.  Undulating lines and shapes create a wide variety of spaces and provide an adaptable landscape. 

Various programming has been implemented across the site to build connections throughout the core. A vehicular Auto Court offers a welcoming drop-off and pick-up location for visitors, as well as a vehicle display opportunity. The court is centered within a sculptural grove of evergreen trees to create a memorable experience both day & night. 

The campus encourages indoor/outdoor connections, with office buildings and garden terraces that sit next to a large central court. The central court, which serves as the heart of the campus, features a dramatic natural water feature which catches and stores stormwater for irrigation, as well as fixed benches, moveable café tables and chairs, and canopy trees that provide an abundance of shade. The amenity enriched landscape also includes a variety of other outdoor spaces, including a central green, which will support concerts, events, and other gatherings; outdoor meeting rooms; a fitness lawn; and a ½ mile decomposed granite trail that runs around the perimeter of the site. 

The design intent evokes the spirit of North Texas and focuses heavily on sustainability. Bio-swales collect stormwater from roads and parking lots to preemptively treat and reduce run-off that is released into the filtration and collection tanks. The planting utilizes native species that are adapted to the local environment and use little water. The greatest landscape planting gesture on the project is the significant amount of native Texas prairie restoration.

PROJECT INFORMATION
Location:
Plano, TX
Team: KDC, Corgan, Kimley-Horn, L.A. Fuess Partners, Pacheco Koch, Terracon, RKEI
LEED:
Platinum Certified
Awards: ULI North Texas, Excellence in Execution and Sustainable Design
Rendering Credit:
Corgan, OJB